Articles for the ‘Creative Learning’ Category


Tricycle

Eight questions for Juliana Ayeni-Stevens

Friday, February 3rd, 2017 by Tricycle

Juliana Ayeni-Stevens is one of our Trainee Producers on our ambitious Takeover2017 project, Mapping Brent.

Trainee Producer Juliana Ayeni-Stevens

What attracted you to Mapping Brent?

I’ve always had a great interest in theatre and I knew someone who happened to have taken part in the Takeover in 2015. I didn’t really know much about the Takeover but I knew I wanted to produce. I spent weeks keeping an eye on Tricycle’s website and the opportunity just came up to apply and so I did. Initially I was not aware that it would be a project bringing the community of Brent together, until the interview stage and when given a brief overview I knew that I wanted to do it.

 

What piece of theatre has made a big impact on your life?

Oh goodness this is hard question because I love the theatre but if I could pick one piece of theatre that has made a big impact on my life it would be Cuttin’ It at the Young Vic… it really touched me and there was a moment where a friend who I went to see the performance with had to ask me midway through the performance if I was okay. I had a moment of standstill and reflection and that’s what I believe theatre should do for you.

 

If you could work with one actor, director, writer or other creative, who would you choose and why?

Ooooo wow…..now that is a hard question if I had to pick one director, one writer and actor it would be;
Writer – debbie tucker green
Director – Yaël Farber
Actor – Adelayo Adebayo

I picked them because firstly debbie tucker green as a writer is amazing, her style of writing is special for me and allows you as the audience to really think. Adelayo is a young female actor who I’d recently seen at the Young Vic in Cuttin’ It and her performance blew my mind. And Yaël Farber as director because of Les Blancs [at the National Theatre].

 

Where would you most like to visit on holiday?

Brazil and St. Lucia. I always been drawn to Brazil it holds a special connection to my life, I’m not exactly sure what it is but I feel spiritually I’m connected to there. And St. Lucia because I just love it… I’ve been there twice and it’s beautiful.

 

If you could only eat one meal for the rest of your life, what would you choose?

KFC hot wings! Oh my gosh they are de BEST! There was one week where I went to KFC every night to get them hot wings!

 

What’s your worst habit?

My worst habit is that I overthink everything from the small situation to the off the scale dramas.

 

If you could only keep five possessions, what would they be?

  1. My memory box
  2. A book
  3. Notebook & Pen
  4. My Frank Ocean Albums
  5. My iPad

 

What achievement are you most proud of in your life so far?

Graduating uni. I say that because when I was in school I was told I wouldn’t get far in the educational system and far in life by my form teacher. I left school with just 6 grade Cs but to the teachers that wasn’t good enough. But I found out that the same teacher who told me I wouldn’t get far in life was extremely surprised that I was in university. It just goes to show whatever you set your mind to you can achieve whatever it is plus prove those doubters wrong!

Find out more about Mapping Brent and Takeover 2017, including how you can get involved


Tricycle

Eight questions for Simon Paris

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 by Tricycle

Simon Paris is one of seven Trainee Producers on our ambitious Takeover2017 project, Mapping Brent.

 

Simon Paris: Mapping Brent Trainee ProducerWhat attracted you to Mapping Brent?

I’m a big fan of The Tricycle, so I often look on their website for opportunities and vacancies. I saw this opportunity and wanted to hear more about it & after speaking to (Tricycle Creative Learning Officer) Natalie about the role and what I’d learn from it I thought it would be a perfect place for me to learn.

 

What piece of theatre has made a big impact on your life?

I don’t think I’ve seen anything which has had a big impact on my life, but each time I see a Frantic Assembly show, it fills me with inspiration to create work, be it directing, writing, producing. They’re a great tool for me, when I’m feeling lethargic to boost me back up.

 

If you could work with one actor, director, writer or other creative, who would you choose and why?

Chris Morris. I like that he creates work that is an expression of his humour and has found the right medium for it. I’m not a fan of all of Chris Morris’ work, but that makes me like him more because it proves to me that his work is just for himself, not for the general public, not for one specific target audience, but for himself. For example he opens each episode of Jam with a monologue written by himself, which is incredibly down to interpretation but offering the audience no answers about it. I like that he doesn’t beg to be understood.

 

Where would you most like to visit on holiday?

Russia, on my own. I like exploring new places alone, making no plans and seeing where I end up. I want to go to Russia because it seems like a really scary place, especially the night-life, which makes it an even more exciting place to visit.

 

If you could only eat one meal for the rest of your life, what would you choose?

Calamari. (With a garlic and cheese dip).

 

What’s your worst habit?

Saying words ironically for a while, then they become part of my vocabulary. Such as, ‘lol’ ‘yolo’ ‘soz’ ‘mate’ ‘buddy’ ‘hashtag’ and so on.

 

What’s your favourite place in Brent?

In Brent Cross there is an Aunt Bessie’s Pretzel place. #cheesepretzels

 

What achievement are you most proud of in your life so far?

As a one-off event, rehearsals through my first play with Fictive Theatre is a proud achievement. As well as the good show, I’m proud that I managed to make it through a 6 week schedule of 9am-5pm rehearsals, then 6pm-2am bar work, 6 days a week. It’s probably the biggest mental challenge I’ve ever put myself through and came out the other side. Since then I know how important and also how not important sleep is.

 

Find out more about Mapping Brent and Takeover 2017, including how you can get involved


Tricycle

Seven Questions for Biba Osman

Friday, November 18th, 2016 by Tricycle

Biba Osman is one of seven Trainee Producers on our ambitious Creative Learning project, Mapping Brent.

In the first of a new series, we caught up with Biba to find out a bit about her interests.

 

Trainee Producer Biba OsmanWhat attracted you to Mapping Brent?

I strongly believe that theatre and the arts can play a vital role in the empowerment and development of young people; particularly those on the ‘margins’ of our society. To be able to produce a celebration that is dedicated to young people’s theatre is an exciting project to be a part of, especially as the project will be taking place in different parts of Brent, outside of mainstream or traditional theatre settings.

Coming from an acting background, a recent drama school graduate who is pursuing my career in producing, the Tricycle have offered me an amazing opportunity to practically learn the vital roles that a producer plays within a community project like Takeover, but also on a wider scale.

 

If you could work with one actor, director, writer or other creative, who would you choose and why?

There are too many to list! But Charles Martin who directed ITV drama Marcella would be amazing. It was a captivating thriller and I would love to understand how he pieced the show together and what the thought process was behind it.

 

Where would you most like to visit on holiday?

I would love to visit Santorini in Greece. The views are just perfect, and somewhere I would go to relax!

 

If you could only eat one meal for the rest of your life, what would you choose?

Pizza, please!

 

What’s your worst habit?

I think that my worst habit has to be over-thinking.

 

What’s your favourite place in Brent?

Kilburn High Road – it’s always busy and there is always something going on day or night.

 

What achievement are you most proud of in your life so far?

Graduating from the Royal Central School of Speech & Drama this summer. Going back to education as an older student wasn’t easy but I managed to persevere with it and I believe that it is one of the best decisions that I have made as it has opened doors and opportunities for me in the early stages of my career. I have also learnt a lot about myself in the process and where I want to be in my life.

Find out more about Mapping Brent and Takeover 2017, including how you can get involved

 


Tricycle

Flicking the Switch – meet Francis from TriCorp

Thursday, May 26th, 2016 by Tricycle

That’s right, you heard correctly – Tricycle Young Company are back! Following a sell-out run earlier in the year as part of Takeover 2016: Paradise, Switch is making a triumphant return to the Tricycle. So if you missed out on you chance to ‘flick the switch’ back in March, get on it and book now.

Tricycle Young Company have been working hard to develop and re-vamp the show ready for four performances on 19th and 26th June. In the first of our flicking the switch blog series, we meet Young Company member Nicholas Marrast-Lewis who talks to Heather Agyepong about working for the mysterious TriCorp company…

This is also the LAST Young Company performance in the theatre before we close for an exciting period of renovations – read more about our Capital Project here.

Switch is an immersive theatre experience that takes place across the whole of the Tricycle building. To book, click here.


Tricycle

Celebrating 10 Years of Minding The Gap

Monday, November 9th, 2015 by Tricycle

We’re preparing to celebrate the tenth anniversary year of Minding the Gap, a creative learning project that provides young refugees, asylum seekers and migrants who have recently arrived in London the opportunity to use drama and theatre to express themselves, develop their voices and help prepare them for life in the capital.

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We currently deliver over ten workshops every week at our home in Kilburn, engaging more than two-hundred students and a team of fifteen international practitioners from Greece, Italy, Poland and America. Working collaboratively, they use a range of theatre techniques and activities to boost confidence and self-esteem, culminating in a performance of theatre and short films written and performed by the students themselves.

In the London Borough of Brent, where we’re based, over one hundred and thirty languages are spoken in the surrounding secondary schools. It is the only borough in London to place young asylum seekers, refugees and recently arrived migrants in reception classes before they move into mainstream schooling. The supportive environment of the rehearsal studio provides students with the perfect opportunity to develop confidence and the skills required to work together as a team. In addition to developing their spoken and written English, students come away with a sense of pride that they have been a part of the Tricycle.

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Fay Byron, a teacher from the Greenway Project at Claremont School in Brent said: “We always expect that the Minding the Gap project will boost our children’s confidence, as they are usually rather shy and reluctant to talk when they first join us. The project has definitely achieved that this year and thanks to the excellent facilitators, we have seen some remarkable changes in the children’s levels of confidence and spoken ability. It is a joy to see how much they have changed, and we are not sure whether this change could have been achieved without the aid of the Project.”

Nadia Papachronopoulou, a Drama Facilitator for Minding the Gap said: “Over the course of a year we create a show for the main stage at the Tricycle and made short films. The young people work with a professional playwright and professional film crew to help tell their stories and realise their ideas. I have never seen a performance where the actors are so happy to be part of a production, it has been incredible. I have watch participants turn from shy and self-conscious to be able to confidently speaking in English and always volunteering to do more acting! This program has been very empowering and allowing young people who have not been to a theatre before to be part of a company where they are the actors and I look forward to continuing this in the coming years.”

For more information on these projects or to find out about how to get involved, please contact the Creative Learning Team on 020 7625 0134 or email creativelearning@tricycle.co.uk.


Tricycle

What’s Your #Passion? Alex and Bolaji

Thursday, July 31st, 2014 by Tricycle

The excitement for next week’s Tricycle Young Company production of The Kilburn Passion is palpable! For what is life without a bit of passion? Tricycle Young Company all share one thing- a lifelong love of the stage. Today Young Company members Alex and Bolaji tell us what keeps them going.

The Kilburn Passion runs from 5 – 9 August, with tickets for under 26’s just £8. Click here for more info.

 

 


Tricycle

What’s your #Passion?

Monday, July 14th, 2014 by Tricycle

The Kilburn Passion by Suhayla El-Bushra is set to burst back onto the Tricycle stage from 5 – 9 August following a successful premiere earlier this year as part of the Tricycle’s Takeover Festival.

So we’re asking members of Tricycle Young Company to tell us what they’re passionate about! Today we have a video blog from Rachael who is passionate about theatre, play writing and the issues around regional arts funding.

Tell us what your passionate about using the hash tag #KilburnPassion @tricycletheatre

For more information on The Kilburn Passion and to book, click here.


Tricycle

Scott Graham, Artistic Director of Frantic Assembly on The Believers…

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014 by Tricycle

 

 The Believers rehearsalsThe Believers rehearsals

Initially all that existed was a title, The Believers, and the briefest synopsis – it is about belief systems. Apart from that, I was starting from scratch.

The first research and development we did was driven by the book Religion Explained, a fascinating insight into belief and anthropology, I then decided to look at horror films, as they inspire us to believe in the absurd and I was interested in how far our belief systems might bend and alter when presented with different situations. That might be fear and terror, or it might be the promise of great reward.

These were early directions but many of them are still applicable in what became The Believers. When you set out to make a show, it can take at least two years and in that time you can change direction, take wrong turnings, get lost, or meet sudden inspiration – something that came to Eddie and I in the early hours of the morning after our first preview as it struck us that what we had all just watched was a beautiful painting. It was crafted to within an inch of its life but it remained two-dimensional. It was not leaping out and embracing or shaking us, which led us to spending the next day giving the production a bit more oomph. By 21:00 that night, it had become clear that our hard work was well worth it – it had leapt out at us, gripped us for 70 minutes and then released us feeling shaken and very proud.

I think The Believers illustrates why I cast actors and then get them to move. The four performers were cast on their acting ability and their potential to give their best physically. Eddie and I were confident we could introduce them to the physical world and get them strong and confident physically. When we had achieved that, we knew that their acting skills would then come to the fore – and, of course, they did. 

You can find out more about The Believers on our website here


Tricycle

Blog Takeover: OVER!

Thursday, April 10th, 2014 by Tricycle
Yolanda (right) performing in The Kilburn Passion

Yolanda (right) performing in The Kilburn Passion

We’re all still recovering from the mental week of theatre, film, music and workshops that was the first ever Tricycle Takeover Festival, which finished last week. What better way to round off an unbelievable festival than with one of our first Young Company bloggers, Yolanda, returning to give us her final outlook on the events…

I don’t have any children, and I’ve never been pregnant, but stepping off The Tricycle stage felt like I’d just given birth; that I had brought into the world this thing/being/creation that we have been working on and anticipating for months. It’s amazing because after a lot of blood, sweat and tears, I can definitely say hard work pays off. Our first night of The Kilburn Passion felt like a beautiful dream that I didn’t want to awake from. Everything seemed to go perfectly- there probably were minor mistakes, but I believe this helped us to solidify and depict the story that Suhayala wrote.

One of the best things about this experience has to be the cast.  It feels so weird to say, but I genuinely felt like I was on stage with a group of friends: telling a story, sharing a dance and other intimate moments from our characters’ journeys in front of an audience. As we did more shows, the FUN heightened and I felt like I could explore my character “Steph” more, and I discovered a variety of dimensions to her sassy yet emotional demeanour. I think that, as a whole, the cast all seemed to be exploring their characters during the shows and by the last show I felt that we had evolved as an ensemble and individuals, and really made The Kilburn Passion “HD”.

Being a part of The Kilburn Passion has been a remarkable experience, and I can’t wait to see where my Tricycle Young Company journey takes me.

You can find out more about the Tricycle Young Company on our website here.


Tricycle

Blog Takeover: Toy Kangaroos, Group Birthing & Opening Night Nerves

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014 by Tricycle
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The Kilburn Passion in rehearsal

Today we have a blog from Tricycle Young Company Member Luke, who is acting in The Kilburn Passion which is opening tonight as part of the Takeover Festival! We’re really rooting for all the Young Company actors gearing up to open to a packed house of Kilburn locals and theatre lovers. As the age old saying goes, break a leg guys!

It seems any blog about my experiences working on The Kilburn Passion would need to start with a bit of background first. Starting anything with “at last week’s rehearsals, after introducing ourselves to a toy kangaroo called Kennedy, we began to plot out the chorus’ baby birthing scene and the cream doughnut fight” definitely needs a bit of context and explanation.
 
My journey with the Tricycle’s Young Company starts back in Summer 2013 when Mark Londesborough, the Creative Learning Director at the Tricycle Theatre, came to do a talk for a youth project I was involved with about the Tricycle’s plans for the Takeover Festival. I left that Q&A with one note: “Tricycle Theatre Young Company – SIGN UP”. A few weeks later, with an audition booked in, I made my way to Kilburn and sat nervously on the tube, wondering what to expect. And so ensued one of the most relaxed and enjoyable auditions I’ve ever had. I was put in a room with 20 other young people with a passion for theatre and we were allowed to simply play, explore, and have fun with our own interpretations of various scenes and situations that we were given. I left that audition even more resolved that this project at this theatre was something that I just had to be involved with in whatever way I could.
 
Luckily, two weeks later I received ‘The Email’. As any actor will know the first step to opening such emails involves desperately scanning with fingers over the eyes for the words ‘unfortunately’, ‘however’ or ‘the standard was particularly high’. Thankfully, it included neither and it was inviting me to join the Young Company for 2013/14. Needless to say I was ecstatic; primarily because, based on my audition, the standard was indeed very high. From my short time spent amongst them, The Tricycle seems to draw in tirelessly passionate, driven and talented people that make it a genuinely enjoyable place to just hang out; whether you are working there or not and that was certainly reflected in the people who came to audition for the Young Company.
 
And of course, that is not more palpable than in the young people who made up the final company and those working with us. Not only are we led by the wonderful Emily Lim, who is one of the most dynamic and endlessly energetic people I have ever had the pleasure to be around, let alone be directed by. We are also enormously blessed to be working alongside playwright Suhayla El-Bushra.  Suhayla’s insights into us as individuals, as a company and into society at large have resulted in a truly original and unique play that not only expresses what we as a young company have to say but that feels uniquely ‘of us’.

The Kilburn Passion in rehearsals

The Kilburn Passion in rehearsals

 
The ‘us’ in question of course being the collection of 18 young people that form the Young Company. One rehearsal spent with this company and it becomes evidently clear why a theatre piece is called a play. And at first glance you could be forgiven for assuming that is all we do. However, if anything I have written previously feels like sentimental cheese then prepare for the overripe, matured stilton of it all because this has to be one of the most united, talented and determined bunches of people I’ve ever worked with. Determined in their passion for theatre making; determined in their demand for a ‘voice’ and determined to have fun. Tuesday evenings have come to be one of my most looked forward to times of the week.
 
And the culmination of all of this hard work, passion and determination? A new play, written beautifully by Suhayla; directed effortedly (or whatever the opposite of effortlessly is, because it has sure as hell involved one hell of a lot of effort) by Emily Lim and staged spectacularly by the technical and design team, Elena Peña, Chris Gylee, Jack Knowles, Shannon Foster and Georgina Brazier. Now, as we inch ever terrifyingly close to opening night, the camaraderie and group dynamics come into full effect as we come to terms with the set (all 9 raised platforms of it) and the furiously relentless transitions, choral scenes and prop-journey madnesses! And amidst all this madness, introducing ourselves to toy kangaroos, group birthing scenes and cream doughnuts have well and truly cemented themselves into the norm… and that is slightly worrying, and beautiful at the same time!
 
The Kilburn Passion opens on the 3rd of April as part of the Tricycle’s young people Takeover Festival and I’d like to finally thank Mark Londesborough, Anna Myers and all the other wonderful people behind the scenes at the Tricycle for whom youth engagement in their theatre work is clearly at the heart of what they do. This is not just a youth project, it is a Youth Takeover and I am immensely proud to be even a small part of it.

Tickets are still available for Friday and Saturday performances of The Kilburn Passion– click here to book. And there’s still loads of workshops and events you can take part in until 5 April- click here for more info and to see what’s on.